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Archive for April, 2015

Students, faculty and staff packed the Mount Carmel Auditorium for alumnus Frank Casanova ('80), featured guest lecturer for the Dean’s Distinguished Speaker Series.

Students, faculty and staff packed the Mount Carmel Auditorium for guest lecturer and distinguished alumnus Frank Casanova (’80) – April 23, 2015

Students, faculty and staff packed the Mount Carmel Auditorium (formerly the Grand Courtroom) last Thursday for alumnus Frank Casanova (’80), featured guest lecturer for the Dean’s Distinguished Speaker Series.

Casanova, a senior director for Apple Inc., spoke about his personal life, profession, and the “nonlinear path” that led him from Quinnipiac University to Silicon Valley.

Frank Casaova currently leads a team managing the marketing activities for iPhone and iPad with telco partners around the world. He works with Apple’s Enterprise team helping manage relationships with companies like IBM.

Frank earned his bachelor’s degree in Information Systems (IS) from Quinnipiac University. During the lecture, he spoke about the decision to change his accounting major after an “Introduction to Computers” elective class.

“Computers spoke to me,” he said before giving credit to the friends that helped him through his student career.

After graduating, Frank joined Apollo Computer outside Boston where he was Senior Product Manager for a line of desktop workstation computers. After just a few short months and one large acquisition, Frank was laid off and forced to find another job.

Reflecting on this experience, Frank told the audience, “Don’t sweat it. When the floor is taken out from underneath you, those are opportunities.”

Frank would eventually be recruited by Apple to join their High-End Computer Group, and after more than 25 years, has had four entirely different jobs at Apple’s Cupertino, California headquarters. In Frank Casanova’s opinion, “Changing jobs is good.”

When it comes to management and leadership, Frank tells students to learn as many bad things from bad managers possible, and then push them away. Relationship management is crucial, and the key to successful relationships is being kind, approachable and honest.

(From left) Debbie Casanova ('81), Frank Casanova ('80), Paul Caiafa ('80), Professor Bruce Saulnier

(From left) Debbie Casanova (’81), Frank Casanova (’80), Paul Caiafa (’80), Professor Bruce Saulnier

Quinnipiac University, Frank says, was his “spring board,” and he has remained close with Computer Information Systems Professor Bruce M. Saulnier. Especially in recent years, Frank has enjoyed talking with West Coast hockey fans about the impressive Men’s Ice Hockey team.

Frank and Debbie Casanova (’81), a member of the Quinnipiac University Board of Trustees, have two children, Caelyn and Cory. They reside in Saratoga, Calif., and as one audience member had asked – they are in fact fans of the HBO television show Silicon Valley.

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(L-R) Professor Angela Mattie, Francis Kissi (MBA-HCM '16), Kurt Barwis, CEO/President Bristol Hospital, Jonathan Stewart (MBA-HCM '16), John Midy (MBA-HCM '15), Connor Rand (MBA-HCM '17), Melissa Dowers (MBA-HCM '16), Professor Teresa Tai

(L-R) Professor Angela Mattie, Francis Kissi (MBA-HCM ’16), Kurt Barwis, CEO/President Bristol Hospital, Jonathan Stewart (MBA-HCM ’16), John Midy (MBA-HCM ’15), Connor Rand (MBA-HCM ’17), Melissa Dowers (MBA-HCM ’16), Professor Teresa Tai

Quinnipiac University’s chapter of the American College of Healthcare Executives (QU-ACHE) last month hosted Kurt Barwis, President and CEO of Bristol Hospital, for an informal discussion on the landscape of the health care industry.

Titled, “A Lesson from a Hospital CEO: My Thoughts about the Future,” Barwis spoke about the rewards and challenges of hospital administration, as well as the nature of the rapidly evolving health care management field. Other ‘lessons’ included the trends towards consolidation and for-profit healthcare, and the impact proposed budget cuts may have on Connecticut’s hospitals.

“QU-ACHE is a highly active student organization, and it was our pleasure to host Mr. Barwis for this special event,” said Professor Angela Mattie, associate professor of management and Chair of the Health Care Management and Organizational Leadership department.

Professor Mattie is the faculty advisor for QU-ACHE, and was also appointed to serve on the Regional Advisory Committee of The Connecticut Chapter of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE).

“CT-ACHE has been extremely supportive of our students, which has afforded our members access to a wide network of healthcare executives and a number of internship and work opportunities,” said Professor Mattie.

QU-ACHE is open to graduate-level students in health care management program. It is affiliated with the larger ACHE professional society, to which 30,000 leading health care executives from across the United States belong.

To learn more about health care management at Quinnipiac University or other programs of study, please visit the School of Business website.

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On Wednesday, April 8, the School of Business inducted 104 students into Beta Gamma Sigma, the official honor society for The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). This year’s inductees include 73 undergraduate and 31 graduate students.

Beta Gamma Sigma is the premier honor society recognizing business excellence. (AACSB International)

Beta Gamma Sigma is the premier honor society recognizing business excellence. (AACSB International)

The School of Business holds the elite accreditation of AACSB International, which among other privileges designates a chapter of the renowned honor society at Quinnipiac University. To be eligible for membership, undergraduates must be in the top 10 percent of their class, and graduate students must be in the top 20 percent.

Dean Matthew O’Connor opened the ceremony, welcoming inductees and their guests before presenting the Dean’s Beta Gamma Sigma Scholarship. This year’s recipient is junior Computer Information Systems (CIS) major, Eric Cajolet.

“In addition to his outstanding academic achievements, Erik has been very involved in leadership activities with the CIS department as well as the School of Business,” said Chapter Advisor Richard McCarthy, DBA, and Professor of Computer Information Systems.

The new members were presented with certificates and keys in recognition of their academic excellence. Closing remarks were made by Professor McCarthy.

For a full list of the Beta Gamma Sigma members inducted this year, please click here.

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Three students from the School of Business recently attended the 2015 Northeast Decision Sciences Institute (NESDI) Conference held in Boston, Massachusetts. The students, accompanied by Dr. Robert Engle, professor of international business, presented original research papers that will be published in conference proceedings.

(From left) Professor Robert Engle, Robert Bluze, Karissa Reyes, Briana Nash

 

NESDI is one of several regions of the Decision Sciences Institute, an international professional society that provides forums for academics and professionals across disciplines to present and share research in the study of decision processes. Each year the NESDI conference attracts attendees from more than 20 countries worldwide.

Undergraduate international business students Robert Bluze and Karissa Reyes presented their research paper entitled, “Corporate Social Responsibility: Perceived Performance and Importance Across Industries and Countries.” Bluze and Reyes surveyed subjects from the United States, Italy, and Spain and found significant differences in the importance and perception of corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance by industry among the three countries.

Graduate student and international business alumnus Briana Nash also presented a paper co-written by Professor Engle entitled, “Cultural Intelligence and Cultural Distance: Relationships and Analysis of Individual and Aggregated Measures of Constructs.” Nash and Dr. Engle found evidence supporting the use of individual construct dimensions, rather than commonly used aggregated constructs, in understanding concepts of cultural distance and cultural intelligence.

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