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Archive for October, 2013

"Quinnipiac is among the very best in providing a student-centered business education," said Matt O'Connor, dean of the School of Business. "Our students, faculty and alumni are proud to be included in the 2014 edition of the Princeton Review's 'The Best 295 Business Schools' and to share in the recognition it provides." (Photo by Anna Brundage '13 MS, '15.)

“Quinnipiac is among the very best in providing a student-centered business education,” said Matt O’Connor, dean of the School of Business. “Our students, faculty and alumni are proud to be included in the 2014 edition of the Princeton Review’s ‘The Best 295 Business Schools’ and to share in the recognition it provides.” (Photo by Anna Brundage ’13 MS, ’15.)

The School of Business at Quinnipiac University is one of the nation’s most outstanding business schools, according to the education services company, The Princeton Review. The company features the school in the new 2014 edition of its book, “The Best 295 Business Schools.”

“We recommend Quinnipiac University’s School of Business as one of the best institutions a student could attend to earn a business school degree,” said Robert Franek, Princeton Review senior vice president-publisher. “We chose the schools we profile in this book based on our high regard for their academic programs and our reviews of institutional data we collect from the schools. We also solicit and greatly respect the opinions of students attending these schools who rate and report on their experiences at them on our 80-question survey for the book.”

The Princeton Review’s survey asks business school students about their school’s academics, student body and campus life as well as about themselves and their career plans.

“Quinnipiac is among the very best in providing a student-centered business education,” said Matt O’Connor, dean of the School of Business. “Our students, faculty and alumni are proud to be included in the 2014 edition of the Princeton Review’s ‘The Best 295 Business Schools’ and to share in the recognition it provides.”

The Princeton Review does not rank the business schools in the book on a single hierarchical list from 1 to 295, or name one business school best overall. Instead, the book has 11 ranking lists of the top 10 law schools in various categories. Ten lists are based entirely or partly on The Princeton Review’s surveys of 20,300 students attending the 295 business schools profiled in the book. Conducted during the 2012-13, 2011-12 and 2010-11 academic years, the student surveys were completed online. Some lists, such as the “Best Career Prospects” list, use both student survey and institutional data. One list, “Toughest to Get Into,” is based solely on institutional data.

Read more about the rankings.

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Fifteen new members have joined the faculty at the School of Business and Engineering.

New business faculty include: Timothy Bell, visiting assistant professor of accountingFan Chen, assistant professor of financeRonald Fullerton, visiting professor of marketingJulia Fullick, assistant professor of managementJoseph Gaspar, assistant professor of management; Leshui He, assistant professor of economicsKiku Jones, assistant professor of computer information systemsRajat Mishra, visiting instructor of management; and Robert Yawson, assistant professor of management.

“The strength of any university is its faculty,” said Matthew O’Connor, dean of the School of Business. “I’m extremely proud and excited about the new faculty joining the School of Business and Engineering. They bring a strong sense of intellectual curiosity, commitment to teaching, research, innovation and unbounded energy for the school, its programs and students. We are glad to have them with us.”

The engineering department, which enrolled its first students in 2012, also appointed several new faculty members to help support and develop the program. The department offers programs of study in industrialcivilsoftware and mechanical engineering.

New engineering faculty include: Nebil Buyurgan, associate professor of industrial engineering; Lynn Byers, professor of mechanical engineering; Rehab El Kharboutly, assistant professor of software engineering; John Greenleaf, assistant professor of civil engineering; Corey Kiassat, assistant professor of industrial engineering; and Mary Phillips, assistant professor of engineering.

“The faculty joining the department of engineering this year have a diverse set of skills and backgrounds,” said Justin Kile, associate dean of engineering. “Combined they bring many years of teaching and industry experience, along with a wide range of research interests. One aspect they all share is a commitment to providing students with an excellent education and the foundation they need to succeed after graduation. As part of the first wave of engineering faculty, these individuals will play a significant role in the development of the engineering program at Quinnipiac.”

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chelikani coe kilic

Finance professors Surya Chelikani, Thomas Coe and Osman Kilic

The Academy of International Business-Northeast Chapter awarded Surya Chelikaniassistant professor of financeThomas Coe, associate professor of finance, and Osman Kilic, professor of finance in the School of Business at Quinnipiac University, a Best Paper Award for their paper “Financial Crisis and Contagion: The Effects of the 2008 Financial Crisis on the Turkish Financial Sector” at its annual conference earlier this month in Hartford, Conn.

The International Journal of Applied Economics has also accepted the paper for publication.

 

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Adam Aiken, assistant professor of finance

Adam Aiken, assistant professor of finance

Adam Aiken, assistant professor of finance in the School of Business at Quinnipiac University, and his co-authors, Christopher Clifford of University of Kentucky and Jesse Ellis of North Carolina State University, were awarded the Best Paper in Investments for their paper, “Discretionary liquidity: Hedge Funds, Side Pockets, and Gates” at the Financial Management Association (FMA) Annual Meeting which was held in Chicago, Ill. October 16-19.

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Fan Chen, assistant professor of finance

Fan Chen, assistant professor of finance

Fan Chen, assistant professor of finance  in the School of Business at Quinnipiac University, and his co-authors, Gary Sanger, of Louisiana State University, and Myron Slovin, of HEC Paris, had their paper, “Asset Sales in the Mutual Fund Industry: Who Gains?” accepted for publication in the “Journal of Banking and Finance.”

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Choonsik Lee, assistant professor of finance at Quinnipiac University.

Choonsik Lee, assistant professor of finance 

Choonsik Lee, assistant professor of finance in the School of Business at Quinnipiac University, has been awarded the Chartered Financial Analyst® designation.

The CFA Program is a globally recognized, graduate-level curriculum that provides a strong foundation of real-world investment analysis and portfolio management skills along with the practical knowledge needed in today’s investment industry. It also emphasizes the highest ethical and professional standards. Completing the CFA Program confirms a mastery of the rigorous CFA curriculum, signifies passing all three exam levels, and is one of the requirements for earning the CFA charter.

To earn the CFA charter you must have four years of qualifying investment work experience, become a member of CFA Institute, pledge to adhere to the CFA Institute’s Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct, apply for membership to a local CFA member society and complete the CFA Program.

Lee, who joined the finance faculty in 2011, earned his doctorate in finance from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He also holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial management from the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology.

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David Cadden

Professor David Cadden
Quinnipiac University
Management

David Cadden, a professor in the Department of Entrepreneurship and Strategy in the School of Business, is available to comment on Macy’s plan to open some stores for shopping on Thanksgiving, according to a report in USA Today.

“This obsession with opening stores either at the end of Thanksgiving or now at the beginning of the day is ridiculous. It’s reminiscent of the dreadnought building boom before World War I. Each side feels obligated to build a larger behemoth.

“First of all, Macy’s is requiring a number of employees to participate in the parade in New York City. At least that gives those employees a sense of being in ‘show business.’ Now they expect employees at other locations to give up Thanksgiving with their family to work in the store. Does Macy’s really believe that there will be hoards of shoppers foregoing Thanksgiving celebrations to buy items at discount? As Talleyrand once said, ‘This is worse than the crime, it’s a huge blunder.'”

To speak to Cadden, call John Morgan, associate vice president for public relations, at 203-206-4449 (cell) or 203-582-5359 (office).

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