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CFA InstitueQuinnipiac University has become the latest university to be welcomed into the CFA Institute University Recognition Program. The Bachelor of Science in Finance program has been acknowledged as incorporating at least 70 percent of the CFA Program Candidate Body of Knowledge (CBOK) and placing emphasis on the CFA Institute Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice within the program. This program positions students well to obtain the Chartered Financial Analyst® designation, which has become the most respected and recognized investment credential in the world. As Chair of Finance, Robert Porter, stated, “The CFA designation has become the gold standard for investment professionals throughout the world. We are pleased the CFA institute confirms that our program covers the body of knowledge required to receive this prestigious award.”

Entry into the CFA Institute University Recognition Program signals to potential students, employers, and the marketplace that Quinnipiac University curriculum is closely tied to professional practice and is well-suited in preparing students to sit for the CFA examinations.  Through participation in this program, Quinnipiac University is eligible to receive a limited number of student scholarships for the CFA Program each year.

“Students in these programs study the Candidate Body of Knowledge, which includes the core knowledge, skills, and abilities identified by practitioners worldwide as essential for successful practice,” said Charles Appeadu, PhD, CFA, Head of University Relations at CFA Institute. “By mastering the fundamentals of the CFA Program as well as the Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct, these future investment professionals gain a strong foundation that helps prepare them well to join the growing CFA Institute community dedicated to promoting the highest standards of ethics, education, and professional excellence for the ultimate benefit of society.”

“We are very proud that our financial curriculum not only provides thorough academic foundations but also meets the high standards of the profession,” said Choonsik Lee, Assistant Professor of Finance.  With support from Matthew O’Connor, Dean of the School of Business, and from members of the finance faculty, professors Bob Porter and Choonsik Lee were instrumental in ensuring Quinnipiac University received this special recognition.

The BS program in finance prepares graduates for career opportunities in equities and fixed income analysis and portfolio management, corporate finance, financial services, working capital management, asset valuation, banking and credit analysis. The program also prepares students for graduate work in finance, business administration, law and other related disciplines. For students seeking a special focus during their studies, the undergraduate major offers three unique learning tracks; investment management, wealth management and financial planning, and corporate finance.

For more information on the Department of Finance, please visit http://www.quinnipiac.edu/school-of-business-and-engineering/department-of-finance/

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Institutional investors such as plan sponsors and fund managers prefer American and Western European investments, and intend to pull back from Russian investments over the next year, according to a survey by Quinnipiac University’s Alternative Investment Institute and the Connecticut Hedge Fund Association.

Survey respondents, which were all based in the U.S. and had a total of $1.12 trillion under management, also indicated they planned to stick with their current commodities holdings, despite recent performance by that asset class.

Of all types of investment classes, the commodities category was the one in which the most respondents intend to make no change in their allocations. However, it was the only category in which investors displayed no level of bearishness.

The CRY commodity index is down 11.9 percent since the beginning of the summer, compared to the S&P 500’s return of just about 6 percent over that same time period, the survey said.

Investors were also asked about the Federal Reserve ending its bond buying program last month. While 20 percent said the so-called “taper” has reduced risk tolerance among investors, 40 percent felt there has been no change.

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Lew Nescott is a man who speaks and acts with precision. On November 18, he spoke to students and faculty about operations and intelligence management in Iraq and Afghanistan. Born in a working class steel town in Pennsylvania, Nescott never shied from grit or hardship or the will to sustain. In his words, quoting and paying homage to a Bruce Springsteen song, “the air was dirty, but everyone was working.”  Which is what Nescott does–work to effect. His company  TradeFlow21, which advises companies  in Connecticut who are doing business oversees, is stationed in Hamden.  During his 19 years of university work, he obtained over $20 billion in endowments for a university.  A life long civilian, he is an intelligent man with an intelligence business.  Social media, global trends and international papers are what keep him informed.  Commitment to what he is passionate about, along with incredible analytical skills, make him one of the best in the business.

international foodOn Monday, November 10, the International Business Society hosted its annual dinner in Burt Kahn Court on the Mount Carmel Campus. The all-you-can-eat affair featured a variety of cultural dishes from more than 15 different restaurants in the Hamden-New Haven area.

Each year, proceeds from ticket sales are donated to a different charitable organization. This year the International Business Society chose Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (IRIS), a New Haven-based organization that helps refugees and other displaced people establish new lives in the United States and contribute to the vitality of Connecticut’s communities.

Several members of IRIS leadership were in attendance, as well as President John Lahey, who spoke on the contributions of the International Business Society and Quinnipiac’s emphasis on multicultural exchange.

“This student organization has embodied all of the core values that we uphold ourselves to here at Quinnipiac University including academics, ambition, and diversity,” he said. “It is through this organization that the students of Quinnipiac are able to express their cultural diversity and share their traditions with us all.”

Chris George, a representative from IRIS, thanked the International Business Society for their donation, and he also spoke briefly on the history and mission of IRIS.

International Business Society members served more than 50 trays of sushi, antipasto, cheeses, as well as Chinese, Indian, Cuban, Irish, and Greek foods ranging from the sweet and spicy to the savory and seasoned.

Two members of the QU Chinese Alliance closed out the event, performing a number of traditional Chinese songs for guests finishing dinner.

When asked about the success of the event, Professor Mohammad Elahee, chair of the department of international business said, “This annual dinner continues to solidify the organizations presence on campus and will continue to do so for the length of its time here.”

Undergraduate business students attend an Etiquette Dinner sponsored by Career Development.

Undergraduate business students attend annual Etiquette Dinner sponsored by Career Development.

On Tuesday, November 4, Career Development hosted its annual Etiquette Dinner in the Mancheski Executive Seminar Room to introduce students to the proper way to dine in business.

Diner Chris Roberts, a junior accounting major, believes that this crash-course in dinner etiquette will help Quinnipiac business students project a more professional image when attending formal business meetings.

“I know that in some point in my career, I will be able to apply the skills I have learned at the dinner tonight,” he said.

The evening began with a test of the students’ interpersonal skills while they introduced themselves to one another. This meant assessing they way they greeted classmates and learning how to give the perfect handshake. Applying a method aptly named the “toothpaste test,” students learned that a professional handshake should be firm, but gentle enough so that if they were holding a tube of toothpaste, none would squeeze out.

As the food arrived, the formal table setting and each utensil was named and explained in full detail. The instructor also discussed the differences between European and American styles of dining.

“Before this event, I was not aware of the many nuances of proper dinner etiquette,” said freshman finance major Yi Feng. “These skills are essential today in business because they portray characteristics of a refined and respectful human being.”

Next, the instructor taught the proper way to eat each course of the meal. For example, it is most proper when eating soup to to raise one’s spoons just above the bowl until it stops dripping before bringing it to the mouth to eat. Simple lessons such as this one stress the importance of proper posture when eating to appear attentive and polished.

“What we learned during the Etiquette Dinner will be helpful out of the dining room too,” says Chris. “I absolutely expect to use some of these techniques during my next interview, or at a future internship. If you haven’t attended and Etiquette Dinner yet, I highly recommend you do!”

Anna Jacobs, junior Management major with a concentration in Operations and Supply Chain Management

Anna Jacobs, junior Management major with a concentration in Operations and Supply Chain Management, enjoying her time interning with the New York Yankees.

The School of Business recently introduced its Operations and Supply Chain Management concentration within the Management major. Anna Jacobs, a junior under the new concentration, completed a summer internship with the New York Yankees where she was able to put this knowledge into action.

Anna interned with the franchise’s corporate sales and sponsorship services department. She says that her responsibilities enhanced her leadership skills, which she now applies to her position as President of Rotaract Club, an on-campus service organization part of Rotary International.

“Every day was a new and exciting learning experience. Every day and game brought with it a different crowd, with varying tasks and responsibilities.”

What she loved most about this internship was interacting with her collegues, many of whom came from diverse backgrounds and fields of expertise. The unique culture of her department emphasized group unity, which served as a lesson to Anna in the importance of teamwork.

“I feel fortunate to have been given this unforgettable opportunity interning with one of the most successful sports franchises in the world,” Anna said. “My position gave me insights into the behind-the-scenes operations, and I am thankful for the experience and wonderful, insightful people that I had the opportunity to work with.”

Career Boot Camp

Anthony Vinci with Jill Ferrall, Associate Dean for Career Development

According to Anthony Vicini, “the yearly University wide career fair and the first career fair of the year for Accounting, CIS, Economics, and Finance majors are two of the most important events to attend on campus.”  Anthony is a junior with a double major in Computer Information Systems and International Business.  About 200 companies come to Quinnipiac from a range of industries, and they are in search for the best employees. “ When I was a first year student,” Anthony  said, “I went to the career fair and took it for granted. I walked around, grabbed some free stuff, and then went on my way. Thinking I didn’t need it, or that it was a waste of time because no one ever gets a job from this type of event. Well, I was wrong!”   What Anthony learned is that it is never too early to plan for your future.  Anthony said, “I came out of the summer break on edge waiting for the career fairs. I knew that this was the time to find a company and land an internship. . .  because I want to have a job lined up after I graduate.” With this attitude shift, Anthony was able to walk through the career fair looking confident, professional, and approachable.  He spoke with many companies and distributed countless resumes. This resulted in a internship with one of his top companies and interest from some others. Overall, my experiences at the Quinnipiac career fairs were very valuable and crucial to my future. The most important thing that I learned was even as a first year and second year student it is important to attend these events just to gain the experience and skills necessary to make a lasting impression when it really counts. Also, you never know what will happen.

 

 

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